Category: Practices & Tips

Who needs to wear an SCD and How long Should SCDs Be Worn?: An Interview with Dr. Amy Campbell on Preventing Blood Clot

By Michael Wong, JD (Founder & Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety)

CDC estimates that almost one million Americans suffer from venous thromboembolism (VTE), also known as blood clots. VTE is a term that is comprised of two medical conditions deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which is a blood clot in one or more of the deep veins in the body, usually in the legs, and pulmonary embolism (PE), which is a blood clot in a pulmonary artery in the lungs. 

According to the CDC:

  • As many as 100,000 people die of blood clots each year.
  • PE is a leading cause of death in a woman during pregnancy or just after having a baby.
  • Blood clots are a leading cause of death in people with cancer after cancer itself.

Continue reading “Who needs to wear an SCD and How long Should SCDs Be Worn?: An Interview with Dr. Amy Campbell on Preventing Blood Clot”

Misinformation can be Catastrophic for Cardiovascular Patients

By Andrea Baer (Executive Director, The Mended Hearts, Inc.) and Michael Wong, JD (Founder/Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety)

Making sure you have correct medical information—rather than misinformation (i.e., false information)—could save you from being admitted to the hospital or even save your life.

There is a lot of medical information and education on cardiovascular disease, particularly on the internet. But with that comes the problem of misinformation. Finding trustworthy information can be challenging, and relying upon wrong information can have health ramifications. Just because something is on the internet does not mean it’s medically true.

Misinformation

To read the complete article, please go to Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare by clicking here.

Identifying Patients At Risk of Opioid-Induced Respiratory Depression

Identifying Patients At Risk of Opioid-Induced Respiratory Depression

By Michael Wong, JD (Founder/Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety)

Opioid-induced respiratory depression can lead to serious adverse events and even death, in hospitalized patients. In its Sentinel Event Alert #49, titled “Safe use of opioids in hospitals”, the Joint Commission stated, “While opioid use is generally safe for most patients, opioid analgesics may be associated with adverse effects, the most serious effect being respiratory depression, which is generally preceded by sedation.” The alert was retired as of February 2019 and is now addressed in the commission’s pain management standards for hospitals.

About half of in-hospital cardiorespiratory events occur on the general care floor. Often these events are fatal. Lars W. Andersen, MD (Department of Medicine, Regional Hospital Holstebro, Aarhus University & Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) and his colleagues concluded that acute respiratory events are common in inpatient wards in the US and are associated with a mortality rate of almost 40%.

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3 Myths About Strokes: Don’t Let These Misconceptions About Strokes Affect Your Health

3 Myths About Strokes: Don’t Let These Misconceptions About Strokes Affect Your Health

By Michael Wong, JD (Founder/Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety)

Stroke Myths You Should be Aware of for National Stroke Awareness Month

This month of May is National Stroke Awareness Month. In thinking about National Stroke Awareness Month, I immediately thought of my friend, Mark McEwen, who most people know as a reporter for CBS:

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Misinformation is a Patient Safety Issue

Misinformation is a Patient Safety Issue

By Michael Wong, JD (Founder/Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety)

Misinformation is a Patient Safety Issue

As the Executive Director for the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety, I oversee our blog. I have the responsibility on a weekly basis for writing and vetting articles submitted to us for publication.

Many people rely upon PPAHS for health information (our articles receive more than 10,000 views per month). As we are not a health news agency, we don’t specialize in discussing the latest breaking news – we leave that in the hands of others. 

Rather, the PPAHS blog and website are filled with information and resources that may help improve patient safety and the quality of patient care. This information and resources are not “breaking news,” but rather a considered consolidation of best practices, clinical trial evidence, and experience. Understandably, then, the 10,000 plus website views that we receive each month are usually articles that were written months and even years ago. Hence, we must be extra diligent about citing misinformation.

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4 Tips for Caregiver Burnout

4 Tips for Caregiver Burnout

Editor’s note: In this guest post, Anna Preston, a consultant with Live-In Care Hub, a UK non-profit organization, discusses how being a caregiver can be challenging and provides resources to help manage the stresses of being a caregiver.

By Anna Preston (Live-In Care Hub, a UK non-profit)

Working in the care sector can have its ups and downs, but caregivers may suffer from caregiver burnout. But, there’s no doubting that it is one of the most rewarding jobs you can ever do if you are the kind of person who is able to cope no matter what challenges and situations may arise.

Caring for someone in a professional capacity can be demanding as well as rewarding. This is especially the case if you are providing live-in care services. You’ll be expected to provide a range of care services depending on how much care the client needs. These can range from personal care and domestic support to accompanying them on outings and appointments and looking after the family pet if needed. This is why some caregivers, whether professional or family members, sometimes reach a point where they feel they can’t cope.

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Alzheimer’s caregivers need support

Editor’s note: In this guest post, Anna Preston, a consultant with Live-In Care Hub, a UK non-profit organization, discusses the needs of caregivers of Alzheimer’s patients and provides resources these caregivers can access to get the support they may need.

By Anna Preston (Live-In Care Hub, a UK non-profit)

According to the Alzheimer’s Society, there are more than 670,000 people in the UK [according to the CDC, 5.8 million Americans were living with Alzheimer’s disease] who are caring for people with dementia and these are mostly unpaid, caring for relatives or friends. And while this saves, at the last count in 2014, some £11 billion per annum, the emotional and physical toll on carers is largely unrecorded.

Many dementia patients are cared for through in home care services with professional care staff who receive professional support and training. However, some are dependent on family members or friends who can easily become overwhelmed by the onerous task of caring 24/7 for a person with dementia. There’s no doubt that caring for a dementia patient takes a huge amount of dedication, time and effort whether you’re a professional carer or not and the emotional burden can weigh heavy on you. That’s why you should do everything you can to obtain support and help from friends, family and professional colleagues.

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6 Tips for Easing the Pains of Lockdown and Social Isolation Measures

Editor’s note: Lockdown and isolation measures necessary to battle the COVID pandemic have placed heavy restrictions on our activities. These measures are particularly hard on the most vulnerable people in society, mainly elderly people and those whose health problems meant they were required to take extra care by this “stay-at-home” message. In this article, Anna Preston discusses tips that caregivers can implement to make the lives of those they are caring for better and ease some of the pains of lockdown and isolation measures.

By Anna Preston (Live-In Care Hub, a UK non-profit)

The series of lockdowns through the Covid-19 pandemic turned life for all of us upside down as heavy restrictions were placed on our movements. The ‘stay at home’ message was tough on many people but was undoubtedly tougher on the most vulnerable people in society, mainly elderly people and those whose health problems meant they were required to take extra care by shielding.

This presented a problem for care at home providers who have had to find new ways of keeping their patients’ minds and bodies active and entertained while they were unable to receive visitors. The challenge then was to find a series of online activities to enjoy for those with their own internet-enabled device as well as those who have to share.

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Individualism Fails in the Face of Public Health Crisis Like the COVID-19 Pandemic:

By Michael Wong, JD (Founder/Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety)
COVID has Exposed Weaknesses in the US Healthcare System

Individualism is much prized in the United States.

Most Americans believe that they have the best healthcare system in the world. The title to an article published November 4, 2020, probably expresses this sentiment the best – “Pandemic Or Not, America Has The Best Health Care In The World.”

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