Better Asthma Control Starts with Correct Inhaler Use

Better Asthma Control Starts with Correct Inhaler Use

By Sara Malik (asthma patient studying to go to medical school)

After getting diagnosed with severe asthma at the tender age of three, friends and family often reassured my parents that I would “eventually grow out of it” and that it was probably just “seasonal allergies.” Yes, it is true that seasonal changes can trigger asthma and that many people may outgrow this condition once they reach or pass adolescence. However, it is crucial to recognize that once an individual has developed a sensitive respiratory tract, their airways remain susceptible to asthma triggers for life.

The World Health Organization defines asthma as a long-term disease in which the “air passages in the lungs become narrow due to inflammation and tightening of the muscles around the small airways.” Asthma is a chronic disease that I have never grown out of it, and at this point, I do not know if I ever will. But, I now recognize this is okay because I have learned to accept this reality. I instead direct my energy toward finding ways to achieve and maintain my definition of a “normal” lifestyle. As a patient dealing with this condition for nearly two decades, I have learned a lot about my body and mind, which have played a significant role in helping me control my asthma.

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Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety Internationally Ranked Top-100 Patient Safety Organization: A Personal Perspective on Achieving International Recognition

By Michael Wong, JD (Founder & Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety) 

Can a Small Organization be Internationally Ranked for Patient Safety?

When one thinks about what organizations could be considered a top-100 patient safety organization, these organizations come to mind:

  • Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: #1
  • The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT: #6
  • Institute for Healthcare Improvement: top-100
  • Institute for Safe Medication Practices: top-250

Now, admittedly, some organizations that you might think of being ranked internationally don’t have a patient safety ranking because they have other rankings:

  • The UK’s National Health Service: ranked top-250 in healthcare.
  • The US’s FDA: drug development #2

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Infographic – 6 Myths About Atrial Fibrillation

Atrial Fibrillation (also known as “AF” or “Afib”) is a common heart arrhythmia. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 12.1 million people in the United States will have AFib in 2030, saying:

More than 454,000 hospitalizations with AFib as the primary diagnosis happen each year in the United States. The condition contributes to about 158,000 deaths each year. The death rate from AFib as the primary or a contributing cause of death has been rising for more than two decades.

To help save lives and reduce the incidence of Afib-related deaths, Brittney Harrell, a legislative law clerk in San Francisco who has a passion for design and patient safety, designed this infographic describing 6 myths about atrial fibrillation.

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Sepsis is the Leading Cause of Death in Children

Sepsis is the Leading Cause of Death in Children

By Michael Wong, JD (Founder & Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety)

Pediatric Sepsis is a Common and Deadly Problem

According to the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), pediatric sepsis is a common and deadly public health issue:

Population-based studies of the prevalence of pediatric sepsis estimate 72-89 cases per 100,000 pediatric population in the United States, with over 50,000-75,000 hospitalizations for pediatric sepsis and an associated cost near $5 billion annually. Globally, there are an estimated 22 cases of pediatric severe sepsis per 100,000 person-years and 2,202 cases of neonatal sepsis per 100,000 live births, translating into 1.2 million cases of pediatric and 3 million cases of neonatal sepsis per year. Over 4% of all hospitalized patients younger than 18 years and 8% of pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) patients in the United States have sepsis. Although estimates are challenged by a lack of standardized data collection and inconsistent reporting, these data confirm that sepsis is common in pediatric patients.

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Senior Health & Fitness: 7 Tips For Successful Aging

Senior Health & Fitness: 7 Tips For Successful Aging

By Stella Lincoln (Health & Fitness Specialist, crowdwriter.com)

Getting older doesn’t mean you have a poor medical condition, but knowing what’s normal for your body as you age is crucial. The more you are healthy, active, or fit, the better you will feel in the future.

Exercise is an essential key to successful aging. Many studies have proved that routine exercise has many benefits, and it becomes more important as we age. The advantages of physical activity and exercise help to reduce the impact of heart disease, hypertension, muscle weakness, high cholesterol, depression, and stroke.

Individuals should perform 30 minutes of exercise daily. Doing complete body exercise maximizes heart rate and enhances mood and sleep quality. According to the survey conducted in the United States, the health status of adults aged 65 or older, indicated around 38 percent responded have some disability.

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Who needs to wear an SCD and How long Should SCDs Be Worn?: An Interview with Dr. Amy Campbell on Preventing Blood Clot

By Michael Wong, JD (Founder & Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety)

CDC estimates that almost one million Americans suffer from venous thromboembolism (VTE), also known as blood clots. VTE is a term that is comprised of two medical conditions deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which is a blood clot in one or more of the deep veins in the body, usually in the legs, and pulmonary embolism (PE), which is a blood clot in a pulmonary artery in the lungs. 

According to the CDC:

  • As many as 100,000 people die of blood clots each year.
  • PE is a leading cause of death in a woman during pregnancy or just after having a baby.
  • Blood clots are a leading cause of death in people with cancer after cancer itself.

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Misinformation can be Catastrophic for Cardiovascular Patients

By Andrea Baer (Executive Director, The Mended Hearts, Inc.) and Michael Wong, JD (Founder/Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety)

Making sure you have correct medical information—rather than misinformation (i.e., false information)—could save you from being admitted to the hospital or even save your life.

There is a lot of medical information and education on cardiovascular disease, particularly on the internet. But with that comes the problem of misinformation. Finding trustworthy information can be challenging, and relying upon wrong information can have health ramifications. Just because something is on the internet does not mean it’s medically true.

Misinformation

To read the complete article, please go to Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare by clicking here.

Vaccinations Saving Lives For Centuries

Vaccinations Saving Lives For Centuries

Editor’s note: Chickenpox (varicella) has “practically been eliminated” by vaccination in the US.

By Karen Ekwueme, MD, ABFM, ABOIM

National Immunization Awareness Month & the History of Vaccinations

Oral history suggests that the origin of vaccination dates back to at least 1000 BCE. With all of the recent speculations, conjectures, and fears about the COVID-19 vaccination, the long history of vaccinations and their role as a key public health tool can often be forgotten. In this article, the history of vaccinations is put into perspective, so we can better appreciate their role in saving lives.

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Learning About Opioid-Induced Respiratory Depression from Logan’s Death

Learning About Opioid-Induced Respiratory Depression from Logan’s Death

By Michael Wong, JD (Founder & Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety)

An Introduction to Logan

In 2016, I had the immense pleasure of interviewing Pamela Parker, BSN, RN, CAPA about what happened to her 17-year-old son, Logan. 

Pamela Parker has been a registered nurse for about 30 years. She is a recovery room nurse and, at the time of our interview, worked in the ambulatory procedure unit at a hospital in Indiana. In addition to providing patient care, Ms. Parker is a clinical educator and provides bereavement support. To help others with the loss of loved ones, she writes a blog “Hope for Grieving Mothers.”

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