Respiratory Compromise

Patient Safety at the Center of Error Disclosure: 3 Ways Checklists Help

by Sean Power
November 27, 2013

In 1999, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) reported that anywhere from 44,000 to 98,000 people die in American hospitals because of medical errors. The IOM also found that 90 percent of these deaths are the result of failed systems and procedures. Read More

"The value of medical checklists lies in their concise consolidation of a considered body of knowledge in one simple document." -Eric Coleman, MD
Alarm Fatigue, Respiratory Compromise

5 Benefits of Adopting Patient Safety Checklists

by Sean Power

Patient safety checklists help to make sure no procedural step is forgotten. According to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, checklists are theoretically sound and have contributed to advances in patient safety. As AHRQ states: Read More

Opioid Safety, Respiratory Compromise

How to Prevent ‘Dead-in-Bed’ Syndrome With Patients After Surgery: Q&A With Physician Experts and PPAHS

PPAHS is developing a checklist that would reinforce the need for continuous electronic monitoring for oxygenation with pulse oximetry and ventilation with capnography to help prevent so-called “dead in bed” syndrome.

by Rob Kurtz (Editor in Chief, Becker’s ASC Review)

[With permission of ASC Review this article has been reprinted here. Copyright ASC Communications. For the original article, please click here.]

The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS), an advocacy group devoted to improving patient health and safety, has recently announced it is putting together a working group to create a checklist targeted towards patient-controlled analgesia (PCA).

This checklist would reinforce the need for continuous electronic monitoring for oxygenation with pulse oximetry and ventilation with capnography to help prevent so-called “dead in bed” syndrome. Read More

Opioid Safety, Respiratory Compromise

Preventing “Dead In Bed Syndrome” with Patients After Surgery

Survey found that a patient safety checklist may help prevent “dead In bed” syndrome.

by Michael Wong

In our recently conducted survey among healthcare providers, almost all the respondents (85%) favor the development and use of safety checklists.

Because of this strong desire of healthcare professionals to have a checklist, PPAHS is putting together a working group to create a checklist targeted towards patient-controlled analgesia. This checklist would reinforce the need for continuous electronic monitoring for oxygenation and ventilation. Read More